Citizen Input Still Sought Regarding Sea Level Rise Plan – Take a Survey to Help

In addition the recent public input meetings held by the City of Virginia Beach, the City is asking citizens to take an online survey to help capture your ideas and comments on the Draft Sea Level Rise and Recurrent Flooding Plan.  The survey can be found at the following link.  Please feel free to share this survey with anyone else that may live or work in Virginia Beach.

Click here or on the image above to access the survey https://sites.wp.odu.edu/asert/vb2019/

 

New Sea Level Rise (SLR) Meetings Scheduled – Please Attend One To Make Your Voice Heard

City of Virginia Beach — Comprehensive Flooding Response Plan Meetings
Four Meetings, Each in a Different Area of the City
The City Wants Your Input
When it comes to Sea Level Rise…
What actions can we take as a community?

City Staff Members are teaming up with ODU to get your input at a series of community meetings!
What will you learn?
What is your flood risk?
What are the options for city wide response?
What can you do on your property that could help?
Hear about what the city is considering.

Give the City Your Opinion!
There will be interactive information plus children’s activities
and a drawing for a $50 and a $25 Amazon Gift Card

Meetings in red below are closest for Bayfront residents

Monday, July 29, 6-8 PM — Creeds Elementary School, 920 Princess Anne Rd
Tuesday, July 30, 6-8 PM — Thalia Elementary School, 421 Thalia Drive
Wednesday, July 31, 6-8 PM — Kellam High School, 2665 West Neck Road
Saturday, August 3, 10 AM – 12 PM — Cox High School, 2425 Shorehaven Drive

Can’t come in person? Participate online at http://shorturl.at/chKO8
Find out more about the flooding response plan at www.vbgov.com/pwslr
Email questions and comments to SLR-comments@vbgov.com

Cape Henry Beach Replenishment update

Two emails, one from Mr Adams Public Works COVB & one from Mr Tolson Army Corp.

Subject: FW: Update on Cape Henry Beach Sand Replenishment

Todd,

We will not be able to attend the SDCC meeting tonight. The attached map delineates the dredging and corresponding sand placement areas. The contractor began dredging and sand placement along Cape Henry Beach yesterday, Sunday June 23. The Cape Henry placement is scheduled to take 30-45 days to complete. The dredging from Broad Bay Channel will be placed in the Maple Street Dredge Material Management Area (DMMA) and the small amount of dredging in the Narrows will be placed on the park beach.

Please contact me should you have any questions or require additional information. For now, please direct any project concerns to my attention.

Respectfully,

Dan

Daniel F. Adams, P.E.

Coastal Program Manager

City of Virginia Beach
Public Works Engineering / Water Resources
Municipal Center, Building #2
2405 Courthouse Drive
Virginia Beach, Virginia 23456
Ph. (757) 385-4783
dadams@vbgov.com

And from Army Corp Project Manager:

Subject: RE: [Non-DoD Source] RE: Cape Henry Beach Replenishment – Project Update #1Subject: RE: [Non-DoD Source] RE: Cape Henry Beach Replenishment – Project Update #1

Mr. Solomon,

I apologize for I am out of town this week and unable to attend the meeting. Feel free to distribute my email for residents to reach out to me. To hopefully dispel any major concerns regarding what you mentioned below, we have language in our specifications that says the Contractor shall, to the maximum extent practicable, limit the construction noise on the beach from 7PM – 7AM.

In addition, Cottrell is a good contractor who has completed a lot of beach placement projects in the past, including this project (last time Cape Henry got material in 2009). This should make them efficient in the beach placement work and minimizing their noise disruptions. They brought a large dredge plant for this project, ~19″ discharge, so we expect them to complete work relatively quicker than what we originally projected. I haven’t received a project schedule in a couple of weeks but I estimate them to complete Cape Henry Beach work by end of July, maybe into the first week of August (the variance on this is high). The 500 foot fenced off construction sections of beach will probably be moving west to east at an average pace of 48 hours. Some sections will have more fill than others to achieve the desired consistent berm prism along the entire length of the beach placement area (a target elevation of +7 feet Mean Lower Low Water) and thus take longer.

Please tell the community to use caution when navigating vessels in the proximity of the dredge and dredge pipeline. Also, please inform residents to use caution around the beach placement construction areas. The Contractor will have watches for those who get to close to the construction zone. Please be aware and cautious of dredge pipe that lay on the beach and cross at areas that sand ramps have been constructed over the pipe.

Something that residents may not be aware of that could be communicated at the meeting and limit confusion is that the sandy dredged material placed on the beach may not look like the present material. It is likely to be significantly darker and smell (the smell is contributed to any organic material that has accumulated on the bottom of the Federal Project). The material will be bleached over time by sunlight and the smell will go away relatively soon as the organics are exposed to air and biodegrade.

Please let me know if you or the community have any questions.

Regards,
Chris

Christopher B. Tolson
Design Section, Operations Branch
Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
Office: (757) 201-7012

Editors note: corrected formatting errors this morning.

Dewberry Public Hearings scheduled this week are postponed.

Today at Cox High School

June 3, 2019 – Kellam High School (Southern)

June 5, 2019 – Princess Anne High School (Lynnhaven)

June 6, 2019 – Creeds Elementary School (Southern)

Note: sent with our Take Action Now Category so notice goes out asap.

PUBLIC FEEDBACK REQUESTED for Public Works DRAFT DESIGN STANDARDS MANUAL which will take sea level rise into consideration “for the development of both public and private projects within the City”

Visit VBGov.com Public Works Specifications and Standards page to learn more.

Public Works Specifications and Standards are the technical requirements, policies and procedures for design professionals to prepare plans and reports necessary for the development of both public and private projects within the City.

If you want to affect future development in Virginia Beach, we highly recommend getting familiar with the official city documents, attend the public hearing and provide feedback online.

The public review and comment period will remain open through June 30, 2019. Additionally, a public meeting will be held to discuss the draft document on Thursday, June 13th at the TCC ATC, 1700 College Cresent in the Theater from 9:30 am to 11:30 am.​

Forward written comments to PWDesignStandards@vbgov.com.

Executive Summary

Download Executive Summary PDF here and view below.

City of Virginia Beach

Changes from the current Public Works Specifications & Standards Manual to the
Public Works Design Standards Manual, 2019

Executive Summary

April 23, 2019

The City of Virginia Beach is replacing the current Department of Public Works Specifications and Standards Manual (PWS&S) with a newly created document entitled Public Works Design Standards Manual, 2019. The PWS&S, which was first adopted by City Council in 1994 and includes several amendments, with the most recent being Amendment 9, May 7, 2015, includes standards, policies, procedures, specifications and details for private development as well as specifications and standards for public infrastructure design. The new Public Works Design Standard Manual, 2019, provides design standards for private and public infrastructure to be located in the City’s Right-of-Way and public easements. Many of the standards, policies and procedures applicable only to private development have been removed and will be administered by the Planning Department, Development Services Center (DSC).

The new Public Works Design Standards Manual, 2019, updates the PWS&S to current best engineering practices as referenced in local, state, and federal guidelines. Additionally, some chapters were simplified and outdated information was removed.

A detailed “Summary of Revisions” document has been created to show the specific changes to each chapter of the PWS&S. This document is available at https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/standards- specs/Pages/default.aspx.

The following are highlights of some of the significant changes included in the new Public Works Design Standards Manual, 2019:

 Public Works Role in Private Development Review has been changed to assisting the Planning Department’s DSC technical staff with compliance and technical reviews.

 Stormwater Management. The PWS&S Chapter 8 has been re-written to meet the new DEQ stormwater management standards and criteria and also includes more stringent requirements relative to flood control. Some of the major changes/additions are the following:

• Updated precipitation data as shown in the document must be used in all designs. This equates to an approximate 20% additional precipitation (24-hour rainfall depths and rational method rainfall intensities) for the requisite design storm, over the current National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Atlas 14 data.

• The EPA’s Stormwater Management Model (SWMM) software modelling tool is required to be used for all designs of drainage areas equal to or greater than 20 acres.

• The City has (or will have in near future) completed SWMM models of all (31) drainage basins. Designers must use these models or obtain direction regarding the use of model data from the Public Works Stormwater Engineering Center.

• More specific requirements were added regarding Hydraulic Grade Line and Tailwater Criteria.

• All designs must address Sea Level Rise if the development or project drains to tidally influenced waters.

• A requirement has been added such that every design is required to address the influence of “Seasonal High Groundwater” on the project.

 Chapter 11 of the PWS&S (Site Plans and Subdivision Requirements) has been deleted. The requirements related to Site Plans and Subdivisions will be covered by other documents administered by the DSC.

 Most of Chapter 12 of the PWS&S (Coastal, Waterfront and Flood Plain) has been removed and will be covered in other documents and/or ordinances.

 Requirement was added such that the developer, contractor and/or permittee (at their own expense) will be required to perform a closed circuit television (CCTV) inspection of all constructed storm sewer pipes and culverts upon completion of construction, and repair all deficiencies found.

The draft Public Works Design Standard Manual, 2019, is made available to the public on the City’s website at: https://www.vbgov.com/government/departments/public-works/standards- specs/Pages/default.aspx, for a 60-day public review and comment period. Comments can be submitted to PWDesignStandards@vbgov.com. Additionally, a public meeting will be held to discuss the draft document. After the comment period has ended the comments will be addressed and the Public Works Design Standard Manual, 2019 will be presented to the City Council for approval.

Phillip D. Pullen, P.E. City Engineer

Virginia Beach wants to require developers to factor in sea level rise for new projects

From Pilotonline.com:

“Our goal, as engineers, is to prevent flooding,” said Phil Pullen, the city engineer who is leading the effort. “We’re treading new waters here — no pun intended.”

More, and better, information on a proposed development’s stormwater management plan could help prevent costly mistakes that were made in the past, he said. The often-cited example is Ashville Park, the Princess Anne subdivision that badly flooded during Hurricane Matthew in 2016 and will cost the city millions to fix.

And:

Pullen said he doesn’t know if all of the new stormwater requirements will ultimately pass, calling the process a negotiation with other city leaders and developers.

Photo Credit” Virginian-Pilot

“A newly-released study between Norfolk, Virginia Beach and the Navy recommends sweeping changes that would reshape areas from Ocean View to Sandbridge to prevent floodwaters from cutting off military bases.”

From Pilotonline.com:

The study’s findings carry far-reaching implications that could help shape costly infrastructure improvements in the future.

Proposed solutions would cost between a few hundred thousand dollars to more than $50 million for comprehensive improvements. The study, which is still a draft, looks at possible conditions — and the feasibility of potential fixes — under both 1.5 and 3 feet of sea level rise, focusing on chronic or nuisance flooding and not factoring in possible storm surge events.